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» Summer Term 2015 Graduate Course Offerings

Summer Term 2015 Graduate Course Offerings

The College offers a number of graduate-level courses in the Summer Term. All students interested in applying for graduate study or enrolling in Summer Term graduate courses as non-degree seeking students should contact the School for Professional Studies at (630) 617-3300 or sps@elmhurst.edu.

Three graduate programs enroll new students for the Summer Term—Master of Professional Accountancy, Master of Education in Teacher Leadership and the graduate certificate in Human Geography for AP. Information on the application process is available from the School for Professional Studies.

ACCOUNTING 

ACC 555-37 Negotiations

June 5–July 10, 2015
Lecture: Friday
6:00–10:00 p.m., Circle Hall 131
June 13–July 12, 2015
Lecture Saturday, Sunday
9:00 a.m.–5:00p.m., Circle Hall 131

ACC 571-40 Internship
.75 credit
The purpose of an internship is to provide “real world” experience stressing how textbook knowledge is applied. Students will be required to write a paper detailing their experiences and how the knowledge acquired in the classroom was applied.

June 8–August 1, 2015
TBA

APPLIED GEOSPATIAL SCIENCES

AGS 540-46 Spatial Analysis and Web Mapping
.75 credit
The first of a two-course sequence with AGS 550, this course introduces students to data acquisition, integration, display, 3D visualization, neighborhood and proximity operators, map algebra, cost surfaces, least cost path, emergency response applications, spatial interpolation and approximation, topographic analysis, line of sight, viewshed analysis, landforms analysis, modeling of geospatial processes and hands-on experience with several ArcGIS extensions. Prerequisite: AGS 530.

June 8–August 1, 2015
Online

AGS 560-46 Graduate Internship Experience
.75 credit
This course experience requires the employment of student in an internship working for a GIS professional in the geospatial industry. Student will have a close working relationship with the employer and graduate advisor during internship experience. Current employment may be used with permission of program director. This course may be taken anytime during program with consultation of advisor(s) and program director.

June 8–August 1, 2015
TBA 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

MBA 505-40 Strategies for Creating a Competitive Advantage
This course focuses on how managers of organizations use the strategic management process to create and maintain a competitive advantage. Course topics include the analysis of external and internal environments, the impact of globalization on organizations, strategic decision making, and competitive dynamics. Students actively participate in case study analysis, group decision making, and computer simulation activities. Prerequisites: MBA 500, 501, 502, 503, 504.

June 8–August 1, 2015
TBA

MBA 505-46A Strategies for Creating a Competitive Advantage
This course focuses on how managers of organizations use the strategic management process to create and maintain a competitive advantage. Course topics include the analysis of external and internal environments, the impact of globalization on organizations, strategic decision making, and competitive dynamics. Students actively participate in case study analysis, group decision making, and computer simulation activities. Prerequisites: MBA 500, 501, 502, 503, 504.

June 8–August 1, 2015
Lecture: Tuesday
6:00–10:00 p.m., Cureton Hall 024

MBA 505-47 Strategies for Creating a Competitive Advantage
This course focuses on how managers of organizations use the strategic management process to create and maintain a competitive advantage. Course topics include the analysis of external and internal environments, the impact of globalization on organizations, strategic decision making, and competitive dynamics. Students actively participate in case study analysis, group decision making, and computer simulation activities. Prerequisites: MBA 500, 501, 502, 503, 504.

June 8–August 1, 2015
Lecture: Thursday
6:00–10:00 p.m., Cureton Hall 024

MBA 555-37 Negotiations
June 5–July 12, 2015
Lecture: Friday
6:00–10:00 p.m., Circle Hall 131
June 5–July 12, 2015
Lecture: Saturday, Sunday
9:00 a.m.–5:00p.m., Circle Hall 131

COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS

CSD 501-40 Clinical Practicum in CSD
.50 credit; 2 semester hours
Students treat pediatric and/or adult clients in areas related to receptive language, expressive language, cognitive communication, articulation, voice, fluency, oral motor, and/or feeding disorders.

June 8–July 24, 2015
Lecture: Monday, Wednesday, Friday
8:30–11:30 a.m., Circle Hall 203

CSD 508-30 Counseling/Professional Issues in CSD
.75 course credit; 3 semester hours
Review of counseling and professional practices associated with communication and feeding/swallowing disorders. Develop appropriate interviewing and counseling skills for clients and their families. Contemporary professional issues in CSD will be discussed.

June 12–June 24, 2015
Lecture: Friday
12:00–3:00 p.m., Circle Hall 203

DATA SCIENCE

MDS 549-46 Data Mining Project   
.75 credit
Each student completes a project incorporating the practical application of several of the program’s data mining techniques to one or more data sets provided by the instructor. In addition to the correct use of the techniques and interpretation of the results, emphasis is placed on the student’s ability to gauge the resultant impact on the organization’s business intelligence processes and procedures. Prior to the submission of the final project, students submit a proposal describing the application and the data mining tools to be utilized.

June 8–August 1, 2015
Online

EDUCATION

EDU 521-10 Theory and Practice for Building Academic Literacies in K-12 Classrooms
An advanced study of theories of literacies, the developmental reading process and practical applications and training for and across content areas. Includes training methods and procedures used to develop skills, attitudes, knowledge and understanding of content area reading material, and modification processes developed to maximize literate practices all students. Prerequisites: SEC 300, SEC 310.

June 8–July 4, 2015
Hybrid: Monday–Thursday
9:30–11:00 a.m., Circle Hall 304

EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION

MEC 550-36 Typical and Atypical Development of Preschoolers and Primary Children
The developmental tasks of the preschool and school-age child are the focus of this course. Development in physical, motor, and sensory domains; psychosocial dimensions and health issues are presented. The impact of a disability upon development, the family system, and implications for educational programming are studied. The range of individual differences and disabilities is presented. Clinical component.

June 8–July 18, 2015
Lecture: Tuesday, Thursday
5:00–7:30 p.m., Circle Hall 315

MEC 555-36 Child, Family & Community Relationships
The interdependence of culture, family, and child is a focus of this course. The impact of children with special needs upon families is discussed. Planning family-focused interventions and developing strategies for working collaboratively with parents in a variety of settings is examined. Clinical component.

June 8–July 18, 2015
Lecture: Tuesday, Thursday
7:45–9:00 p.m., Circle Hall 315

KINESIOLOGY

KIN 506-40 Sports and Fitness Nutrition
.75 credit
This course is designed to provide students an introduction to the basic concepts of nutrition, nutrients, and their functions and interrelationships. Focuses on understanding the specific role of energy and nutrients in fitness and athletic performance. Emphasis on the correlation between good nutrition and optimum well-being throughout the life cycle. Additional topics include the role of fluid and electrolytes, ergogenic aids and special diets in physical activity.

June 8–August 1, 2015
Hybrid

NURSING

NRS 502-59 Health Care Systems: Organization, Policy and Finance
.75 credit
Examines the environment of health care systems from an organizational and policy framework. Emphasis is placed on the role of health care finance in shaping care delivery systems and clinical practice. Select global, federal and local policy issues affecting nursing and health care systems are explored. Content in this course provides an essential foundation to exercise clinical leadership in health organizations and advocate for diverse populations.

June 8–August 1, 2015
Lecture: Wednesday
5:00–9:00 p.m., TBA

NRS 538-46 Management of Clinical Outcomes
.75 credit
Focuses on management of outcomes for individuals and populations. Health care systems are analyzed at the point of care to anticipate client risk, identify patterns of problem occurrence, target areas in need of intervention and examine cost. Skills are developed in micro-systems assessment and the use of information systems and technology. Outcomes related to quality, risk and cost are reviewed in relationship to benchmarks. Recommendations for changes in practice for optimal outcomes are explored. Prerequisites: NRS 501, 502, 503, 504, 523 or consent of the program director.

June 8–August 1, 2015
Lecture: Tuesday
5:00–9:00 p.m., TBA

NRS 538-58 Management of Clinical Outcomes
.75 credit
Focuses on management of outcomes for individuals and populations. Health care systems are analyzed at the point of care to anticipate client risk, identify patterns of problem occurrence, target areas in need of intervention and examine cost. Skills are developed in micro-systems assessment and the use of information systems and technology. Outcomes related to quality, risk and cost are reviewed in relationship to benchmarks. Recommendations for changes in practice for optimal outcomes are explored. Prerequisites: NRS 501, 502, 503, 504, 523 or consent of the program director.

June 8–August 1, 2015
Lecture: Wednesday
5:00–9:00 p.m., TBA

PUBLIC HEALTH

MPH 520-46 Public Health Policy and Politics
.75 credit
This course provides an introduction to the structures, institutions and processes of the U.S. government at the federal and state levels, their interrelationships, and roles in shaping public health policy.

June 8–August 1, 2015
Online

TEACHER LEADERSHIP

MTL 514-10 Characteristics of Learners with Disabilities
This course is designed for teachers to examine the development and the diverse educational, physical, motor, communication, social-emotional, and cognitive needs of students with disabilities. Research on and implications for appropriate diagnosis, service delivery and instructional methodology are examined.

June 22–July 10, 2015
Hybrid: Monday–Thursday
9:00 a.m.–12:00 noon, Circle Hall 315

MTL 521-30 Building Professional and Community Relationships through Collaboration
.75 credit
This course involves the study of the collaborative processes and skills necessary for effective interaction among educational professionals, paraprofessionals, parents, and students. Course topics include communication processes, problem-solving strategies, establishing positive collaborative relationships, as well as the management and assessment of collaboration. An additional focus will be on the process and the collaboration necessary for successful transitions throughout life.

July 13–August 1, 2015
Hybrid: Tuesday, Thursday
1:00–4:00 p.m., Circle Hall 304

MLT 524-20 The Educational Assessment Process and Learners with Disabilities
An advanced study of the educational assessment processes and strategies with a review of legal provisions, regulations and guidelines. Focus areas include the uses and limitations of formal and informal assessments, the administration and interpretation of information obtained from both formal and informal measures, strategies for modifying and adapting formal measures (local, state and national), and the Illinois Alternative Assessment Process.

July 13–August 1, 2015
Hybrid: Monday–Thursday
9:00 a.m.–12:00 noon, Circle Hall 315

MTL 544-20 Cross-Cultural Studies for Teaching English Language Learners
This course is designed for teachers to examine the relationship among culture, classroom practices, and policy and how this relationship influences the education of the English language learners. Teachers begin by first examining their own culture and their cultural assumptions and biases and how those influence teaching and learning in the classroom. Issues of equity, access and cross-cultural understandings are examined as well. Teachers will evaluate and design content materials and methods for implementing a multicultural approach to curriculum in the classroom.

July 13–August 1, 2015
Hybrid: Tuesday, Thursday
5:00–8:00 p.m., Circle Hall 304

MTL 552-36 Using Educational Research to Improve Practice
.75 credit
In this course, teachers will read, analyze and synthesize the research literature on teaching and learning to examine and transform their focus areas. Teachers will acquire skills for electronically searching, selecting, and evaluating the most current research literatures. In addition, they will develop the critical thinking and problem-solving skills needed to answer professional questions using the most valid and reliable professional resources.

June 22–August 1, 2015
TBA

MTL 558-10 Theoretical Foundations of Teaching English Language Learners
This course is an introduction to and immersion into the theoretical frameworks of English as a Second Language (ESL) and bilingual education and the research, movements and policies that inform them. A variety of ESL/bilingual models and programs that exist in pre-K through 12 schools and classrooms will be identified, analyzed and evaluated. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between theory and practice and will define their roles as teachers of and advocates for English learners. This course requires field experience hours in an ESL and/or bilingual P-12 classroom.

June 22–July10, 2015
Hybrid: Tuesday, Thursday
5:00–8:00 p.m., Circle Hall 304

MTL 561-36 Understanding the Middle Level Learner
.75 credit; 3 semester hours
An intensive study of the stages of adolescence development as presented through theory, research and practical applications. Students will examine a number of specific aspects of adolescent development including the following: the transitions of adolescence (cognitive, social, biological); the ways in which adolescents function within the many contexts of our society (peer groups, family, school); psychosocial development (personal identity, sexuality, autonomy); and the many issues and problems facing young adolescents in today's world (substance abuse, bullying, depression and suicide). EDU 361 and PSY 318 are undergraduate course equivalents.

June 22–August 1, 2015
TBA

MTL 563-46 The Middle School: History, Philosophy, Organizational Structures and Best Practices
An advanced study of the history, philosophy, organization and procedures of the middle school through observation and participation in a middle school setting as well as through content delivered in the college classroom. Students will explore a number of middle level topics including age-appropriate instructional methods and strategies, the development of curriculum for the middle school learner, and classroom management strategies. Additional topics will address the cognitive, emotional, social, and physical developmental stages of the middle level learner. EDU 360 is the undergraduate course equivalent.

June 8–August 1, 2015
TBA

MTL 597-10 Promoting Professional Development for School Improvement
.75 credit
In this course, teachers examine how different models of professional development impact student learning. They research and evaluate models of effective professional development in education designed to meet teaching and learning needs. Teachers learn how to observe instruction and provide coaching, mentoring, and professional development to colleagues. Readings and assignments are aligned with the Professional Learning Domain of the Teacher Leader Model Standards.

June 22–July 10, 2015
Hybrid: Tuesday, Thursday
1:00–4:00 p.m., Circle Hall 304

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

SCM 540-46 Inventory Strategies
.50 credit; 2 semester hours
The course examines the role of inventory and various strategies in managing inventory in the supply chain. Topics include traditional versus zero-based inventory approaches, controlling cycle inventory, the role and cost of safety stock in managing uncertainty, optimizing product availability, shared risk issues, inventory velocity, stock-outs implications, sourcing strategies and inventory decision-making techniques and tools.

June 8–August 1, 2015
Lecture: Monday
6:00–8:10 p.m., Cureton Hall 024

SCM 541-46 Warehouse Management Strategies
An examination of the strategic nature and importance of an effective warehouse network in the supply chain. Topics include the changing role of the warehousing function; value-added services; warehouse space needs forecasting; basic warehouse layout and design factors; material handling design; the decision to buy or lease warehouse space; and location analysis.

June 8–August 1, 2015
Lecture: Monday
8:20–10:30 p.m., Cureton Hall 024

SCM 575-46 Project in SCM
A final team project presentation and paper to demonstrate the integration of all aspects of the program. Subjects will be developed and approved in cooperation with the cohort's faculty team.

June 8–August 1, 2015
TBA

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Undergraduate Admission • (630) 617-3400 • (800) 697-1871 • admit@elmhurst.edu

 

School for Professional Studies • (630) 617-3300 • (800) 581-4723 • sps@elmhurst.edu

 

Elmhurst Learning and Success Academy Admission • (630) 617-3752 • elsa@elmhurst.edu

 

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