Communication Arts & Sciences

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Communication Arts & Sciences

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Course Offerings

2013–2014

One unit of credit equals four semester hours.

Communications
Theatre
Applied Theatre

Communications

COM 113 Communication in Contexts
An introduction to the foundations of theory and practice in oral communication.  Topics will include: (a) interpersonal context; self-concept, listening, conflict management, verbal and non-verbal communication, gender roles, relationship development and maintenance; (b) public context; effective oral presentation skills, audience analysis, communication anxiety, and organizational patterns; (c) small group context; effective decision-making, leadership, empowerment, cultural diversity, group dynamics, team management, and participation. Appropriate for English Education students and others seeking to satisfy the oral communication requirement for the State of Illinois. Spring Term.

COM 114 Interpersonal Communication
A course designed to enhance interpersonal communication skills as well as survey-related theoretical foundations. The focus of the course is on verbal and nonverbal forms of human interaction. Issues such as listening, self-disclosure, conflict management, and relational development and disengagement are explored in theory and practice.

COM 174 Radio Practicum
.25 credit
General introduction to the aspects of broadcasting. Basic training and introduction to production equipment and the day-to-day workings of WRSE, the campus radio station. Five hours per week of participation is required for all radio practicum courses. Other requirements may be specified by the station manager. Courses must be taken in sequence. Pass/No Pass grading.

COM 210 Introduction to Video Production
A theoretical and practical study of the techniques, materials, and dynamics involved in the creation and production of short video programs, with consideration of issues and ethics. Students create instructional, documentary, or dramatic productions. Alternating Spring Terms.

COM 211 Survey of Mass Communication
A survey of the history and development of mass media in America. The origin, nature, and interrelationships of media are examined. Fall Term.

COM 213 Public Speaking
An introductory course in oral presentation that combines theory with practical application.

COM 217 Principles of Interviewing
This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of communication principles within the context of various types of pro­fessional interviews (e.g., employment, performance-appraisal, exit, disciplinary, etc.). Course will focus strongly on in-class performances of simulated interviews, role-plays, and presentations. Spring Term.

COM 218 Nonverbal Communication and Effective Listening
Effective communication in all contexts requires careful attention to nonverbal communication and listening. Scholars have long recognized that these two essential components of successful communication are necessarily entwined. This hybrid course is designed to help students identify and appreciate how they can improve their communication skills by watching and listening to what they and others are saying. This will be achieved by identifying, assessing, and learning how to practice effective management of nonverbal communication and listening skills as they pertain to the workplace and social settings. Fall Term.

COM 220 Introduction to Organizational Communication
Introduction to basic concepts, theories, and practices relevant to the understanding of communication in organizational contexts. Provides a communicatively based definition of formal organization and explores historical and contemporary theories pertaining to individualorganizational relationships.

COM 274 Radio Practicum
.25 credit
Advanced opportunities in the radio industry, including music air shifts, promotions, news, sports, and other administrative duties at WRSE. Participation may be in the form of an independent on-air music show, or administrative responsibilities assigned by the station manager in a specific area of interest, such as news, promotion, or music. Five hours per week of participation is required for all radio practicum courses. Pass/No Pass grading.

COM 312 Small Group Communication
A course designed to explore the nature of group processes, with an emphasis on effective task-group discussion, decision making, problem solving, and conflict resolution. Development of personal leadership skills and observational-analytic skills through structured group communication activities. Prerequisite: COM 114. Fall Term.

COM 315 Intercultural Communication
Both cross-cultural and intercultural aspects of communication, verbal and nonverbal, are examined in domestic and international cultures. Cultural differences in values and beliefs are also examined. Important dimensions of communication are treated in specific contexts such as medical, business, and social. In
addition, students will be asked to analyze their own intercultural variables and communication behaviors. Overall, this course will build cultural awareness and knowledge of how to transcend cultural and ethnic differences to build community through communication.

COM 316 Communication Theory
A course that surveys the major theories in the field of communication, analyzing theories of nonverbal, intrapersonal, verbal, mass, intercultural, and relational communication. Emphasis on the relationship among theory, research, and communication science. Prerequisites: COM 114 and one other course at the 200 level or above.

COM 317 Persuasive Communication
Examination of the rhetorical and social scientific theories of persuasive communication. Students will gain practical experience by examining the ethical, logical, and motivational means of influencing others in a variety of persuasive situations. Course work will include analysis, criticism, and application of persuasive discourse across a diverse range of contexts. Spring Term.

COM 318 Gender and Communication
A course designed to examine gender as it is created and recreated through the process of communication. This course focuses on gender and gender stereotypes in four primary contexts of media, education, organizations, and intimate relationships, such as friendships and family relationships. Students will gain a better understanding of the process of communication and how it affects the social construction of gender. Spring Term.

COM 319 Business and Professional Communication
A course designed to improve speaking and listening skills essential to effective communication in a variety of business and professional settings. A systematic approach to informative and persuasive presentations, principles of interviewing, small-group problem solving, and oral briefings. Prerequisite: COM 213. Fall Term, Summer Term.

COM 320 Organizational Communication
This course focuses on the application of communication principles as applied to organizational contexts. Communication theories within the organizational framework are examined. Attention is given to strategies for communication-related problems and issues assessing and managing within organizations. Prerequisites: COM 114 and one other 300-level COM course. Spring Term.

COM 321 Case Studies in Organizational Communication
A course designed to analyze problems and issues in organizational communication through case histories, exercises, and projects. The course takes a case-study approach, focusing on typical communication difficulties in organizational contexts. Prerequisite: COM 320. Alternating Spring Terms.

COM 322 Conflict Management
A course designed to enhance conflict communication skills focusing on understanding the theories of conflict, the nature and function of conflict and how communication contributes to conflict management and resolution. Prerequisite: COM 114. Alternating Fall Terms.

COM 323 Family Communication
Communication is central to the functioning of the family and extended family systems.  This course explores topics that are relevant to understanding communication phenomena in the setting of the family.  Topics include:  families as systems, patterns, meanings, rituals, stories, roles and types, family life cycles, stressors and conflict, power and decision-making, family forms and contexts.

COM 324 Applied Conflict Management and Negotiation
This course is designed to develop students' conflict management and negotiation skills in professional contexts. Students will explore the inevitability of conflict and how to respond to it while maintaining a working relationship. Students will also develop an understanding of when negotiation is considered appropriate and/or necessary. The course explores effective communication techniques to employ in conflict and the phases of conflict and in negotiation. Students will learn a variety of techniques and how to apply the appropriate skills based on relational and environmental contexts.

COM 325 Oral Interpretation
A lecture and laboratory course dealing with the analysis, appreciation, and communication of literature to an audience. Open to juniors and seniors or with consent of instructor. Spring Term.

COM 331 Language, Identity and the Rainbow
This course examines the evolution of the LGBTQ movement through a critical analysis of the foundations of this community—the community's rhetoric and resulting rhetorical coping strategies. Students will explore issues of sexuality, identity, power and marginalized populations in social movements, literature and popular culture. Students will increase awareness of their "others," resulting in higher levels of communication competence.

COM 353 Special Topics in Communication Studies
An opportunity for intensive exploration of a particular topic chosen by the instructor. Repeatable for credit.

COM 374 Radio Practicum
.25 credit
Management experience in the radio industry. Involvement in the day-to-day running of a radio station. Opportunity to continue on-air music shows while developing a more comprehensive understanding of station management issues. Five hours per week of participation is required for all radio practicum courses. Pass/No Pass grading.

COM 411 Issues and Problems in Mass Communication
An examination of the impact of mass communication media on society. Research findings are discussed in terms of their political, social, and ethical implications, as well as their relationship to contemporary theories. Prerequisite: COM 211 or equivalent. Alternating Spring Terms.

COM 413 Advanced Public Speaking
Students will refine and enhance their rhetorical skill set and ability to act as a public advocate. They will participate in researching significant societal issues and the subsequent construction of arguments surrounding these topics. Students will also refine and enhance their delivery style during both classroom, campus and community presentations.

COM 419 Business and Professional Communication in Online Contexts
Advanced exploration of business and professional communications, which includes the curation, interpretation, and analysis of documents and information. Covers the generation and management of online communications within social media and other Web 2.0 platforms.

COM 420 Ethics and Critical Issues in Communication
This course is designed to help students develop a conceptual framework for evaluating communication ethics, and examining controversial issues and case studies in a variety of communication contexts, with a particular focus on media communication settings. Students will explore fundamental issues and standards of ethics in interpersonal, group, public, and mass communication contexts. Prerequisite: COM 316. Fall Term.

COM 450 Leadership and Communication
This course is an overview of the relationship between communication principles and the phenomenon of leadership. Analysis of various leadership approaches and their communicative content are undertaken. Students will be asked to engage in qualitative research exploring the nature of leadership as a product of human communication. Prerequisite: COM 316. Alternating Spring Terms.

COM 468 Internship
.50, 1.00 or 1.50 credit
Designed to provide junior and senior communication studies, interdisciplinary communication studies, and organizational communication majors with supervised, on-the-job experience with participating businesses, government agencies, institutions and radio/television stations. May be taken during the regular term with part-time employment of 7 to 13 hours weekly for one-half course credit, 14 to 17 hours weekly for one course credit, 18 to 20 hours weekly for one-and-one-half course credit, or during Summer Term with 36 to 40 hours per week. Applications should be made early in the term preceding registration and are reviewed on the basis of academic grade-point average, faculty recommendations, professional progress, and demonstrated interest. Repeatable for credit. Consent of instructor required during previous term unless exception is granted by internship coordinator. Offered for Pass/No Pass grading.

COM 474 Radio Practicum
.25 credit
Advanced programming in radio, including research and production of public affairs programming for broadcast. Continued participation in station management and music shows. Five hours per week of participation is required for all radio practicum courses. Pass/No Pass grading.

COM 490 Senior Seminar: Topics in Communication
This senior seminar is a capstone option for communication majors. This course will allow students an opportunity to pursue advanced study of a topic in communication beyond the regular course offerings. Topics will vary each year and could include race and gender in the media, cultural identity in the media, the dark side of communication, and the role of communication within the liberal arts. Students will write a literature review paper on a course topic as the capstone of their work in the major. This course should be taken in the spring term closest to a student's graduation, assuming that student is not choosing to do an internship in communication as his or her capstone in the major.

COM 492 Independent Study in Communication
.25, .50 or 1.00 credit
Majors may engage in directed study of a chosen subject. Studies may include creative projects, directed readings, or research. Consent of instructor required.

COM 495 Honors Independent Research
.50 credit
This course affords Honors Program students the opportunity to design and implement a significant research project in the field of communications culminating in an appropriate public dissemination of the research methods and findings. This research must build upon previous course work taken within the major or minor, facilitating faculty supervision and guidance. Repeatable for credit. Permission of the faculty supervisor and the Director of the Honors Program required prior to registration.

COM 498 Internship: Capstone
1.00 or 1.5 credit
Designed to provide senior communication studies, interdisciplinary communication studies, and organizational communication majors with supervised, on-the-job experience with participating businesses, government agencies, institutions and radio/television stations. May be taken during the regular term with part-time employment of 14 to 17 hours weekly for one course credit or 18 to 20 hours weekly for one-and-one-half course credit. Additional assignments required as part of a capstone experience in communication. Applications should be made early in the term preceding registration and are reviewed on the basis of academic grade-point average, faculty recommendations, professional progress and demonstrated interest. Prerequisite: consent of instructor required during previous term unless exception is granted by international coordinator.

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Theatre

THE 173, 273, 373, 473 Improvisation Ensemble
.25 credit or non-credit
This course contains training, rehearsal, and performance in acting improvisation techniques, including on-the-spot improvisation, sketch comedy, uses of improv in pedagogy, and solo and ensemble improvisation as a creative technique. The ensemble will perform and offer seminars and workshops on campus as well as at area high schools, junior colleges, and civic events. Repeatable for credit. Must be taken for credit to count towards the major. Pass/No Pass grading.

THE 175, 275, 375, 475 Theatre Practicum
.25 credit or non-credit
Practical study in all phases of theatre, including performance, technical production, and management. Students are required to average five hours of participation per week and to attend seminars arranged by theatre faculty and led by theatre professionals. Repeatable for credit. Must be taken for credit to count towards the major. Pass/No Pass grading.

THE 176, 276, 376, 476 Musical Theatre Practicum
.25 credit or non-credit
Practical study in musical theatre. Participation in a mainstage musical produced by Elmhurst College required. Students are required to average five hours of participation per week over the space of the term. Students must attend seminars led by musical theatre professionals. Pass/No Pass grading. Repeatable for credit. May be taken for non-credit. Must be taken for credit to count toward major.

THE 208 Middle Eastern Dance Through History to Today
A multi-faceted exploration of the development of Middle/Near Eastern Dance (RAKS SHARQI) throughout history to its current status. The political, sociological, ethnomusicology, theological, historical (and more) environments which have shaped, developed, hindered, grown and evolved this dance form are studied. The origin of the misnomer “belly dance” will be addressed. Special focus will be on the impact of religion and politics on this performance art. The course will be taught in both classroom and studio settings. No prerequisite. January Term.

THE 221 Dance Appreciation
Designed for all individuals; no prior dance experience is necessary. A survey of dance as an art form in the United States, ranging from the early 1900s through to the present. Students will learn about the history and evolution of dance in its various forms through lecture and required reading, viewing and discussing videos relating to lectures and outside reading, and viewing live dance-related performances on campus and throughout the greater Chicago area. Students will also participate in movement exercises in class initiated by the instructor that physicalize what has been recently read and viewed. Alternate years, Spring Term.

THE 225 Acting
This course is an exploration of the theory and practice of stage acting, from basic technique to ensemble performance. Open to all students, regardless of experience. Recommended for non-majors.

THE 226 Acting Technique I
The beginning course in the actor training sequence. The student will gain a strong foundation in acting technique through character development, strong acting choices, acting exercises, and voice and movement technique. Prerequisite: theatre, musical theatre, or theatre arts education majors, theatre minors and/or consent of instructor. Fall Term.

THE 227 Development of the Theatre
An introduction to the art of the theatre from its historical roots to contemporary practice. Topics include theatre as an art form, the structure and types of drama, theatre architecture, the role of the audience, and contemporary production practice. It is recommended that theatre majors take this course early in their program.

THE 228 Stagecraft
A theoretical and practical study of the traditional and contemporary techniques involved in play production. Fall Term.

THE 238 Introduction to Design
This course introduces the basic elements of design. Students will discover how line, shape, color, value and texture work together in all theatrical design areas to create good storytelling.

THE 301 Voice and Movement for the Stage
A practical laboratory course for the exploration of physiological and phonetic foundations in voice and movement for the stage. This fundamental course encourages students to explore and develop their personal physical and vocal awareness and control. Spring Term.

THE 302 Ballet
.50 credit 
Designed for all levels of dancers; no prior dance experience is necessary. This course focuses on providing a strong foundation of core, classical ballet technique. Each class will consist of a thorough barre warm-up, center technique exercises, across-the-floor patterns, and cumulative combinations choreographed by the instructor. A stronger sense of body awareness, balance, flexibility, and core-centering strength will be developed. May be taken for non-credit. Must be taken for credit to count toward the major. Repeatable for credit.

THE 303 Jazz Dance
.50 credit 
Designed for all levels of dancers; no prior dance experience is necessary. Students will learn and perfect the fundamentals of jazz movement vocabulary, learning the style and technique of this genre. Each class will consist of a thorough warm-up, center technique, across-the-floor patterns, and cumulative combinations choreographed by the instructor. The aim of this course is to create knowledge of and enthusiasm for jazz dance as a popular art form. A stronger sense of body awareness, balance, flexibility, and rhythmic sensibility will also be developed. May be taken for non-credit. Must be taken for credit to count toward the major. Repeatable for credit.

THE 304 Tap Dance
.50 credit 
Designed for all levels of dancers; no prior dance experience is necessary. A strong foundation in core tap vocabulary is established, focusing on a musical theatre-based tapping style. Each class will consist of a warm-up, center technique, across-the-floor patterns, and cumulative combinations choreographed by the instructor. Students will also have the opportunity to learn about significant contributors to the field and to watch footage of various tap artists and discuss their insights. A stronger sense of rhythm and musicality will be developed. May be taken for non-credit. Must be taken for credit to count toward the major. Repeatable for credit.

THE 305 Social Dance and Period Styles
.50 credit 
Designed for all individuals; no prior dance experience is required. Students will learn the style and technique of various period-specific dance forms: Waltz, Foxtrot, Polka, Tango, Cha-Cha, Charleston, Swing, and Jitterbug. Specific attention will be given to learning proper partnering techniques thereby developing participants’ special awareness. Students will also be exposed to the masters of these dance genres by watching related video footage. May be taken for non-credit. Must be taken for credit to count toward the major. Repeatable for credit.

THE 306 Modern Dance Technique
This course is designed for all levels of dancers; no prior dance experience is required. Each class will consist of a thorough warm-up, center technique exercises, across-the-floor patterns, and cumulative combinations choreographed by the instructor. Students will be encouraged to express themselves physically, in both literal and abstract ways, and thereby expand their movement vocabularies. A stronger sense of rhythm, musicality, flexibility, and core strength will be developed as students are introduced to basic styles and technique principles of various modern choreographers. May be taken for credit or non-credit. Must be taken for credit to count toward minor and major. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: THE 306, or consent of the instructor.

THE 314 History of Musical Theatre
A survey of the development of American musical theatre from its origins in the 19th century through its current place in 21st century culture. Spring Term.

THE 326 Acting Technique II
An intermediate course in which the student will refine abilities in making strong acting choices, through basic character development, acting exercises, and scene study. Prerequisite: THE 226 or consent of instructor. Fall Term.

THE 328 Intermediate Design for the Stage
In this course, students will learn how to research and analyze scripts within the context of design, and utilize the basic elements of design in a collaborative environment to create designs in lighting, scenery and costumes.

THE 329 World Theatre and Drama in Cultural Contexts
An investigation of specific world cultures and civilizations through the study of performance traditions, dramatic literature, cultural studies, and historical texts. At the end of the course, the student will be able to critically discuss issues involving culture, civilization, politics, religion, faith, art forms, and dramatic literature. The course investigates specific performance traditions and dramatic literature of cultures and co-cultures chosen from Asia, Africa, Australia, Europe, South America, and North America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Spring Term.

THE 331 History of Western Theatre I
A historical survey of theatre and drama as a reflection of Western society from classical Greece through the English Restoration, 1660–1700. Fall Term.

THE 332 History of Western Theatre II
A historical survey of theatre and drama as a reflection of Western society from the English Restoration through the 20th century. Spring Term.

THE 338 Costume Construction
This course is an introduction and overview of the techniques of costume construction. It is designed to provide practical skills in the basics of sewing and in the fundamentals of costume construction. Projects, activities, and topics will include the costuming process, the investigation of fabrics, an introduction to the development of patterns, clothing terminology, garment construction, and methods of altering the look of both fabric and garments.

THE 340 Creative Drama
A participatory study of creative dramatics, an improvisational, process-oriented form of theatre. Experiences include individual and group work, movement and pantomime, improvisation and creative playmaking. Theoretical and exploratory study includes the development of strategies for utilizing creative dramatics in various settings across the K-12 spectrum. January Term, alternate years.

THE 350 Play Analysis
This course investigates play analysis—the academic and creative processes of exploring scripts as foundations for creating performance. Analysis will explore dramatic action, dramatic structure, character development, environments which shape the action of a play, and the challenges of context and convention. This writing intensive course will include a wide range of writing perspectives, including dramaturgy, performance critique to an exploration of theory.

THE 352 Special Topics in Theatre
An opportunity for intensive exploration of a particular topic chosen by the instructor. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

THE 402 Advanced Ballet
.50 credit 
A more accelerated, advanced version of THE 302. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: THE 302 or consent of instructor. 

THE 403 Advanced Jazz
.50 credit 
A more accelerated, advanced version of THE 303. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: THE 303 or consent of instructor.

THE 404 Advanced Tap
.50 credit   
A more accelerated, advanced version of THE 304. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: THE 304 or consent of instructor.

THE 405 Advanced Social Dance and Period Styles
.50 credit  
A more accelerated, advanced version of THE 305. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: THE 305 or consent of instructor.

THE 406 Advanced Modern Dance Technique
This course is designed for experienced modern dancers; extensive modern dance experience is required. Each class will consist of a thorough warm-up, center technique exercises, across-the-floor patterns, and cumulative combinations choreographed by the instructor. Students will be expected to express themselves physically, in both literal and abstract ways, and thereby expand their movement vocabularies. A stronger sense of rhythm, musicality, flexibility, and core strength will be developed as students apply more advanced technique principles and styles of noteworthy modern choreographers. May be taken for credit or non-credit. Must be taken for credit to count toward minor and major. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: THE 306, or consent of the instructor.

THE 421 Choreography of Dance
This course is designed for serious dance students with strong interest in and background of dance. Various artistic methods for approaching choreography, the composition of dance, are covered. Different approaches to the creative process behind dance composition are explored, and each student will be challenged to invent his/her own approach to the creation of dance movement. Students will also be exposed to various methods of presenting and teaching dance material to others. Prerequisite:  at least one 400-level dance course, or consent of instructor. Alternate years, Spring Term.

THE 424 Directing
A course designed to examine the art and process of play direction in a seminar as well as a laboratory setting. Prerequisite: THE 226 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Spring Term.

THE 426 Acting Technique III
Advanced scene study and monologue preparation. Emphasis is placed on preparing for auditions and professional acting. Prerequisite: THE 326 or consent of instructor. Fall Term.

THE 428 Design for the Stage
An advanced course in theatre design, including advanced theatre technology techniques. This course prepares the student for the requirements of stage design, including lighting, set, costume, and sound. The student will understand the design process from initial production meetings through to the realized production. Prerequisite: THE 228 or consent of instructor. Fall Term.

THE 440 Teaching Theatre Arts
A study of general pedagogical principles that apply to the teaching of communication and theatre in secondary schools. Must be taken prior to student teaching. Prerequisite: SEC 410. Open to seniors or with consent of instructor.

THE 468 Internship
.50, 1.00 or 1.5 credit
Designed to provide junior and senior theatre majors with supervised, on-the-job experience with participating professional theatres or media stations. May be taken during the regular term with part-time employment of 7 to 13 hours weekly for one-half course credit, 14 to 17 hours weekly for one course credit, 18 to 20 hours weekly for one-and-one-half course credit, or during Summer Term with 36 to 40 hours per week. Applications should be made early in the term preceding registration and are reviewed on the basis of academic grade-point average, faculty recommendations, professional progress, and demonstrated interest. Offered for Pass/No Pass grading. Prerequisites: consent of instructor required during previous term unless exception is granted by the international coordinator.

THE 470 Avant-Garde Theatre
This seminar will allow students to become familiar with the new and creative dramatic and performance styles of the twentieth century. From Ibsen to the Theatre of the Absurd and Dadaism to the Living Theatre, the twentieth century was an era of innovation and experimentation. Through the reading of dramatic literature and the history of various styles and movements, students will gain an understanding of contemporary theatre. January Term.

THE 471 Holocaust Theatre
Study of theater, performance, history, dramatic literature, and anthropology related to the Holocaust, including plays, films, historical studies, and ethnographies. The students will understand how individual people dealt with the situations of the Holocaust before, during, and after World War II through the study of performance texts.

THE 492 Independent Study in Theatre
.25, .50 or 1.00 credit
Studies may include creative projects as well as directed reading and research in theatre. Open to juniors and seniors with consent of instructor.

THE 495 Honors Independent Research
.50 credit 
This course affords Honors Program students the opportunity to design and implement a significant research project in the field of theatre arts culminating in an appropriate public dissemination of the research methods and findings. This research must build upon previous course work taken within the major or minor, facilitating faculty supervision and guidance. Repeatable for credit. Permission of the faculty supervisor and the Director of the Honors Program required prior to registration.

THE 498 Theatre Capstone
This course serves as a culmination of scholarship and creative application of theatre studies and practice. Designed for seniors, the course addresses pre-professional preparation and addresses the needs of students preparing for graduate study. This course has the potential for the integrating theatre with other disciplinary studies. In this seminar course, students will develop final projects in consultation with faculty advisors. Projects will include research, writing, and creative components. Projects may include informal or formal presentations on or off campus.

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Applied Theatre
Applied, private instruction in theatre. The choice and use of materials are left to the discretion of the instructors in each area. Term final examinations are presented before a jury of theatre faculty. Students are required to present excerpts from the materials studied.

Students entering with previous theatre training are placed at the proper level as determined by audition and interview. Non-credit lessons will be graded P/NP and have no jury requirement.

Students registering for applied theatre courses are required to take a one-half hour lesson per week or its equivalent for a 0.5 credit course. Non-credit listings may be repeated. Course must be taken for credit to count toward any major in the theatre program. Enrollment for all applied theatre listings is contingent on the consent of the instructor.

Acting
Frank Del Giudice, Kecha Kambe, Joel Huff, Tony Noice, Betsy Peterson, Patricia Skarbinski, Edwin Wilson 
ATA 011 Non-credit Acting
ATA 101-402 .50 credit

Costuming
Janice Pohl
ATX 011 Non-credit Costuming
ATX 101-402 .50 credit

Directing
Janice Pohl, Alan Weiger, Edwin Wilson 
ATD 011 Non-credit Directing
ATD 101-402 .50 credit

Musical Theatre
Amy Lyn McDonald, Betsy Peterson, Scott Uddenberg
ATM 011 Non-credit Musical Theatre
ATM 101-402 .50 credit

Playwriting
Frank Del Giudice
ATW 011 Non-credit Playwriting
ATW 101-402 Credit Playwriting

Stage Management
Rick Arnold, Janice Pohl, Alan Weiger
ATS 011 Non-credit Stage Management
ATS 101-402 .50 credit

Theatre Business/Administration
Rick Arnold, Janice Pohl, Edwin Wilson
ATB 011 Non-credit Theatre Business/Administration
ATB 101-402 .50 credit

Theatre Design and Technology
Rick Arnold, Alan Weiger
ATT 011 Non-credit Design and Technology
ATT 101-402 .50 credit

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