World Languages, Literatures & Cultures

Course Offerings

2013–2014

One unit of credit equals four semester hours.

Arabic
Chinese
French
German
Italian
Japanese
Spanish
World Languages

Arabic

ARB 101, 102 Elementary Arabic I, II
Conversation and fundamental grammatical structures introduced through communicative exercises and practice in reading and writing, speaking and listening. Cultural context emphasized. Prerequisite: ARB 101 or equivalent for ARB 102. ARB 101 Fall Term, January Term; ARB 102  Spring Term.

ARB 201, 202 Intermediate Arabic I, II
Continued development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Significant exposure to various cultures of the Arabic-speaking world through film, music, art, mass media and student presentations. Prerequisite: ARB 102 for ARB 201; ARB 201 for ARB 202. ARB 201 Fall Term; ARB 202 Spring Term.

ARB 492/292 Independent Study
A course for students of Arabic who wish to pursue an intensive program of study on an
individual basis. Students must gain approval of department chair and instructor through a clear proposal of a unique project that cannot be realized in a traditional setting.

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Chinese

CHN 101 Introductory Chinese I
This is the first term of a beginner's level Chinese course with a focus on developing students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in the target language. This course intends to help students build a solid foundation for all four communicative skills, i.e. listening, speaking, reading and writing, in standard Mandarin in an interactive environment in class and through completing assigned work outside the class.

CHN 102 Introductory Chinese II
This is the second term of a beginner's level Chinese course with a focus on developing students' listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in the target language. Students will build on the linguistic base gained from the introductory course with more language structure and vocabulary. Prerequisite: CHN 101.

CHN 201 Intermediate Chinese I
This is an intermediate level Chinese course. Students will continue to develop their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills in the target language. Prerequisite: CHN 102 or equivalent.

CHN 202 Intermediate Chinese II
This is an intermediate level Chinese course. Students will continue to develop their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills in the target language. Prerequisite: CHN 201 or equivalent.

CHN 301 Advanced Chinese Conversation and Composition
The emphasis of Chinese 301 is to reach an advanced level of listening, speaking, reading and composition in Mandarin. Consulting authentic primary sources such as Chinese periodicals and audiovisual materials, students must engage with different aspects of contemporary Chinese life and culture while building a better vocabulary and more fluency in the target language. Prerequisite: CHN 202 or equivalent.

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French

FRN 101, 102 Elementary French I, II
Conversation and fundamental grammatical structures introduced through communicative exercises and practice in reading and writing, speaking and listening. Cultural context emphasized. Prerequisite: FRN 101 or equivalent for FRN 102. FRN 101 Fall Term; FRN 102 Spring Term.

FRN 201, 202 Intermediate French I, II
Practical conversation, review of grammar through oral practice, use of films and other materials. Development of the skills of speaking and listening and the ability to communicate effectively while traveling in French-speaking countries. Intensive review of grammar. Prerequisite: FRN 102 for FRN 201; FRN 201 for 202. FRN 201 Fall Term; FRN 202 Spring Term.

FRN 301 French Conversation and Composition
Emphasis on improving oral and written expression of accurate, idiomatic French. Focus on improving communication skills through the enrichment of vocabulary, the reading of contemporary poetry and prose, and the use of videos, films and magazines. Prerequisite:
FRN 202.

FRN 302 Advanced French Conversation and Composition
Final review of grammar. Writing of one- to two-page compositions about topics of French culture and literature. Development of vocabulary and syntax necessary for sustained conversation in French. Prerequisite: FRN 301.

FRN 305 Business French
Presents the lexical, syntactical and stylistic features typical for business French. Reading and discussion of business articles and correspondence. Study of cultural aspects of business communication. Areas covered include banking, advertising, import-export, insurance, computers and travel. Prerequisite: FRN 301 or consent of instructor.

FRN 313, 314 Cultural Heritage of France I, II
A historical survey of French civilization in which literature, history, geography, arts, science and political institutions are studied. Provides a framework in which to understand literature as well as contemporary events. Development of reading skills and emphasis on the cultural, sociological and aesthetic implications of the texts. Prerequisite: FRN 301.

FRN 335 French/Francophone Literature in Context I–Pre-1800
Selected readings in French and/or Francophone literature written between the Middle Ages and 1800. The focus of the course, which varies, will be defined in terms of a genre or theme. Individual works will be studied within their social, political, historical and aesthetic contexts. Sample topics: 17th-Century Theater, Love Across the Centuries, Revolutionary Literature. Taught in French. Can be repeated once for credit with different focus. Prerequisite: FRN 301 or consent of instructor.

FRN 336 French/Francophone Literature in Context II–Post-1800
Selected readings in French and/or Francophone literature written after 1800. The focus of the course, which varies, will be defined in terms of a genre or theme. Individual works will be studied within their social, political, historical and aesthetic contexts.  Sample topics: Paris in 19th- and 20th-century French literature, the Francophone novel, 20th-Century French and Francophone Theater. Taught in French. Can be repeated once for credit with different focus. Prerequisite: FRN 301 or consent of instructor.

FRN 452 Directed Reading
A seminar providing the opportunity for intensive study of an author, a movement, or another discipline. Some past topics have included film and literature and advanced business French. Repetition for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: FRN 302.

FRN 492/292 Independent Study
A course for French majors who wish to pursue an intensive program of reading on an individual basis. Students must gain approval of department chair and instructor through a clear proposal of a unique project that cannot be realized in a traditional setting.

FRN 495 Honors Independent Research
See WL 495.

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German

GRM 101, 102 Elementary German I, II
Introduction to German. Focus is on communicative competency, i.e., learning to understand and speak German. Study of German culture. Most learning of the language is done through drill sections, lab sessions, interviews and role playing. Prerequisite: GRM 101 or equivalent for GRM 102. GRM 101 Fall Term; GRM 102 Spring Term.

GRM 201, 202 Intermediate German I, II
Continued development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Use of films, slides and tapes to develop skills and learn more about German culture. Readings about German life. Includes a comprehensive review of grammar. Prerequisite: GRM 102 for GRM 201, GRM 201 for GRM 202. GRM 201 Fall Term; GRM 202 Spring Term.

GRM 301 German Conversation and Composition
Primary emphasis on improving listening, speaking and writing skills. Use of readings covering many different aspects of contemporary German life and culture. Short compositions and grammar review. Prerequisite: GRM 202 or equivalent. Fall Term.

GRM 302 Advanced German Conversation and Composition
Final review of grammar. Writing of one- to two-page compositions about topics of German culture and literature. Development of vocabulary and syntax necessary for sustained conversation in German. Prerequisite: GRM 301 or equivalent. Spring Term.

GRM 305 Business German
Presents the lexical, syntactical and stylistic features typical for business German. Reading and discussion of recent business articles and correspondence. Study of cultural aspects of business communication. Topics include banking, advertising, import-export, travel and industrial relations. Prerequisite: GRM 301 or consent of instructor.

GRM 313, 314 German Civilization and Literature I, II
A historical survey of the history, literature, geography, arts and political institutions of the German-speaking countries. Background for an understanding of contemporary German culture and of the literary traditions of the German-speaking peoples. Required of all German majors. Prerequisite: GRM 301 or equivalent.

GRM 335 German Literature in Context I
Selected readings in German literature written before 1900. Individual works will be studied within their social, political, historical and aesthetic contexts. The focus of the topics course will vary. Sample topics: The Novella 1700– 1900; Literature and German history—Reformation to 1900; Literature and philosophy; Literature in the context of music and the graphic arts. Taught in German. Can be repeated once for credit with different focus. Prerequisite: GRM 301 or equivalent.

GRM 336 German Literature in Context II
Selected readings in German language literature written between 1900 and the present. Individual works will be studied within their social, political, historical and aesthetic contexts. The focus of the course will vary.  Sample topics: Viennese literature and culture 1890–1914; literature in Berlin 1910-1945; literature and silent film in the Weimar era; Expressionism in drama, art and architecture; literary responses to the Third Reich (exile, Holocaust, Nazi aesthetics); Literature and cultural trends after 1945; Contemporary cinema and literature. Taught in German. Can be repeated once for credit with different focus. Prerequisite: GRM 301 or equivalent.

GRM 452 Directed Reading
A seminar providing opportunity for intensive study of an author, a period of German literature, or another discipline. In addition to the readings, emphasis is on oral skills. Some past topics have included: history of the Third Reich, the Novelle, advanced business German and contemporary German culture. Can be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: GRM 301 or equivalent.

GRM 492/292 Independent Study
For German majors who wish to pursue an intensive program of reading on an individual basis. Students must gain approval of department chair and instructor through a clear proposal of a unique project that cannot be realized in a traditional setting

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Italian

Elmhurst College maintains an exchnage agreement that allows students to take Italian at Dominican University, which is 15 minutes away and easily accessible by train. Registration, billing, etc. for these classes is processed by Elmhurst College.

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Japanese

JPN 101, Japanese for Anime Enthusiasts
This is a beginner’s level Japanese course with a focus on developing students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in the target language. Students will be introduced to basic language structure and vocabulary, as well as to two of the three writing systems: hiragana and katakana. The grammatical components will be tied to theme based units, which will explore the cultural aspects of everyday living in Japan. Students will further research these topics and utilize the learned structures by analyzing and discussing their favorite anime as well as those anime that are considered classics in Japan. With the use of commercially produced software, students will apply the learned skills into creating their own anime/manga. The software comes with templates that students can use, so drawing skills are not a necessary prerequisite. Furthermore, this course does not have an art component but will explore the cultural and linguistic side of anime. Student will be graded on the use of appropriate linguistic structures and cultural reference in their works.

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Spanish

SPN 101, 102 Elementary Spanish I, II
Essentials of Spanish grammar and syntax, extensive oral practice and cultural introduction to Spain and Spanish America. Five to 10 hours of work in language lab is required. Prerequisite: SPN 101 or equivalent for SPN 102. SPN 101 Fall Term; SPN 102 Spring Term.

SPN 201, 202 Intermediate Spanish I, II
Continued development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Significant exposure to various cultures of the Spanish-speaking world through film, music, art, mass media and student presentations.Prerequisite: SPN 102 for SPN 201; SPN 201 for SPN 202. SPN 201 Fall Term; SPN 202 Spring Term.

SPN 301 Spanish Grammar and Composition
Primary emphasis on an advanced grammar review as well as the improvement of reading and writing skills through the use of one- to two-page compositions about varied topics. Students will consult Spanish periodicals and audio-visual materials covering many aspects of contemporary life. Prerequisite: SPN 202 or equivalent. Fall Term.

SPN 302 Spanish Conversation, Grammar and Service
Practice in listening and speaking skills as well as the development of vocabulary and syntax necessary for sustained conversation in Spanish. Includes 12 hours of service-learning in the Spanish-speaking community with appropriate preparation and reflection in class.

SPN 304 Teaching Hispanic Children’s Literature in Elementary and Middle Schools
The course combines two different disciplines—education, and Spanish language and literature. The course is team taught and its main objective is twofold. First, it aims to introduce students to the principal movements and representative authors in the field of children’s literature in the Hispanic world. Once students have studied those texts, taking into consideration the socio-historical context, the literary style used, the themes present and other grammatical and lexical considerations, they will proceed to create appropriate lesson plans that will enable them to teach those texts to Spanish-speaking (English Language Learners) or bilingual (English- and Spanish-speaking) elementary and middle school students in the United States.

SPN 305 Spanish for the Professions
Practical application of lexical, syntactical and stylistic features to written and oral communication in the professional world. Study of cultural aspects of business communication and topics such as management, financial affairs, advertising, import-export, insurance and technology. Designed and appropriate for business, medical and other advanced-level Spanish students.

SPN 306 Spanish for the Professions
Practical application of lexical, syntactical and stylistic features to written and oral communication in the professional world. Study of cultural aspects of the medical professions such as interaction with patients and vocabulary associated with common symptoms and insurance. Designed and appropriate for medical, business and other advanced-level Spanish students.

SPN 307 Spanish for Heritage Speakers I
An introduction to academic Spanish and the notion of formal and informal register for heritage speakers who already possess advanced communicative skills in the language. Students will also survey the history, film and literature of the Spanish-speaking world. There is an emphasis on reading, writing and vocabulary building.

SPN 308 Spanish for Heritage Speakers II
Continuation of SPN 307. Reviews grammatical conventions of academic Spanish at an advanced level. Students will continue to survey the history, film and literature of the Spanish-speaking world. Increased emphasis on composition and reading. Prerequisite: SPN 307.

SPN 310 Introduction to Hispanic Literature
An introduction to the critical reading and interpretation of Hispanic literature, principally from Spain and Latin America, through the study of narrative, poetry and drama. Readings, class discussion and reports are in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 302 or equivalent. Spring Term.

SPN 312 Spanish Culture
A historical survey of the culture and civilization of Spain in which geography, ethnicity, art, music, literature and social and political institutions are studied. Provides a framework in which to understand contemporary events as well as literature. Readings, class discussion and reports are in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 302 or equivalent. Fall Term.

SPN 313, 314 Survey of Spanish Literature I, II
A survey of representative major Spanish authors and their works from the Middle Ages to the present. Extensive readings, lectures, class discussions and reports in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 312 or equivalent.

SPN 321 Introduction to Spanish Sociolinguistics
A survey of the Spanish language from a sociolinguistic perspective. Covers concepts such as language vs. dialect, discourse analysis, bilingualism, languages in contact and the relationship between language and pedagogy. Readings, class discussion and reports are in Spanish.

SPN 322 Spanish Pragmatics
On a very basic level, pragmatics refers to the way we convey meaning through communication. This meaning includes verbal and non-verbal elements and varies depending on the context, the relationship between people talking and many other social factors. This course introduces students to the study of communicative acts, miscommunication due to inappropriate pragmatic action and the strategies to learning pragmatic features of a language. Students will survey theories of communication such as courtesy, irony and semantic vs. pragmatic interpretation of speech. Readings, class discussion and reports are in Spanish.

SPN 334 Spanish American Culture
A historical survey of the civilization and culture of Spanish America in which geography,
ethnicity, art, music, literature, and social and political institutions are studied. Provides a framework in which to understand contemporary events as well as literature. Readings, class discussion and reports are in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 302 or equivalent. Spring Term.

SPN 335, 336 Survey of Spanish American Literature I, II
A survey of representative major Spanish American authors and their works from the Conquest to the present. Extensive readings, lectures, class discussions and reports in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 334 or equivalent.

SPN 340 Indigenous Literature of South and Central America
An introduction to the critical reading and interpretation of indigenous literature from Central and South America through the study of narrative, poetry and drama. This class considers the unique foundational mythology of indigenous groups and their distinct contemporary world views. All class work (readings, tests, class discussions and reports) is in Spanish.

SPN 452 Directed Reading
A seminar providing opportunity for intensive study of an author, a period of Hispanic literature or culture, or another discipline. Topics have included Spanish Medieval and Golden Age Literature, Expressive Latino Culture, 20th-Century Latin American Novel and the Spanish Civil War. Repetition for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: SPN 302 or equivalent.

SPN 492/292 Independent Study
For Spanish majors who wish to pursue an intensive program of reading on an individual basis. Students must gain approval of department chair and instructor through a clear proposal of a unique project that cannot be realized in a traditional setting..

SPN 495 Honors Independent Research
See WL 495.

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World Languages

WL 209 World Literature in English
An introduction to the literatures of the French-, German-, Italian- and Spanish- speaking countries, particularly as they reflect the literary and cultural traditions of these regions. Major focus varies according to the background of the faculty member involved. Taught in English. No prerequisite.

WL 215 Genocide and the Holocaust
Study of the causes, development, and contemporary and current responses to the Holocaust. Reading of accounts of survivors and scholars struggling with the meaning of the Holocaust. Requires students to wrestle with the hows and whys of the Holocaust and their significance for their personal and social values. No prerequisite.

WL 230 Chinese Art and Calligraphy
This course is a survey of Chinese visual art with focus on calligraphy. Through an introduction of the major artistic works, primarily calligraphy and painting, from the major Chinese historical periods, we aim to provide a broad framework on Chinese culture reflected in arts. Students will receive instruction and first-hand experience in producing Chinese calligraphy and develop an artistic appreciation of beautiful writing not just limited to the Chinese tradition.

WL 309 World Cinema
An historical survey of a national cinema of a country other than the United States, from its early beginnings to the present day. Study of representative films, directors, genres and movements, as well as the cultural contexts that gave rise to them. Prerequisite: FRN, GRM or SPN 302, or permission of instructor.

WL 319 The Nature of Language
An introduction to the meaning and use of language in our society. Deals with theories of the origin of language, first and second language acquisition, the nature of bilingualism and biculturalism, the structural elements of language and everyday discourse and the relationship between language and society. No prerequisite.

WL 320 Non-Western Culture via Literature and Film
Topical cultural study of Africa, Latin America, or Asia. Literature and feature films from and about selected countries. Students also study the arts, history and cultural anthropology of these countries. Goals: understanding and appreciation of traditions and current issues of non-Western cultures and their place in global society. No prerequisite.

WL 440 Special Methods in the Teaching of World Languages
A study of recent trends, materials and techniques, as well as a consideration of practical problems in the teaching of grammar, culture and literature. Includes lesson presentations to college classes and videotaping of them. Prerequisites: SEC 410, 300-level courses and preferably at least one 400-level course. Usually offered Fall Term with sufficient enrollment. Should be completed prior to the beginning of student teaching.

WL 451 Senior Research Capstone
.50 credit
An intensive guided investigation of a unique research thesis in the area of literature, linguistics, second-language instruction and/or acquisition, cultural studies, gender studies or other interdisciplinary studies in the target language of the major. Students will work with instructor and a cohort of students, meeting throughout the semester to present preliminary research, bibliographies, reflective journal entries, make presentations and complete multiple drafts of a major research project. Required of all majors during the one of the final two terms of study.

WL 468 Internship
Half course
This half-course opportunity is required of all multi-language majors and available to all students. It also fulfills the College requirement for experiential learning, which can also be fulfilled through similar experiences in other departments or study abroad. Requirements include five to eight hours of off-campus internship each week for a minimum of 10 weeks (totaling 50 to 80 hours for the term), a working bibliography, reflective essays and final project as approved by supervising professor.

WL 495 Honors Independent Research
Half course
This course gives Honors Program students the opportunity to design and implement a significant research project in the field of world languages culminating in an appropriate public dissemination of research methods and findings. This research must build upon previous coursework taken within the major or minor, facilitating faculty supervision and guidance. Repeatable for credit. Permission of the faculty supervisor and the director of the Honors Program required prior to registration.

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